Sir Laurence Olivier Intimately Revealed in New, Telling Biography

Brilliant, vicious, magnetic, dedicated, massively insecure, and bitterly competitive, Sir Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) was endowed with a talent and a jealousy unchallenged by his contemporaries. In the new biography, “Olivier” (Quercus Publishing, 460 pages), prize-winning author Phillip Ziegler virtually leaves no stone unturned as he examines not only what made one of our most famous – and occasionally infamous – actor/directors of the 20th Century tick but also the work that influenced generations of actors.

Christopher Innvar and Marg Helgenberger Find an Other Place at MA's Barrington Stage

In a January 10, 2013 review in the New York Times Charles Isherwood wrote, “As you watch The Other Place,a slick, potently acted drama by Sharr White that opened on Broadway on Thursday night at the Samuel J. Friedman Theater, it may strike you now and then that your mind is playing tricks on you. Facts that seem firmly established in one scene melt into vapor a few scenes later, leaving you with a vague itch to press pause to sort things out, or maybe rewind. Or both.”

Creative Conversations about American Theater Take Place on Greenfield Prize Weekend in Sarasota, FL

Playwrights, a producing artistic director and an award-winning actress had “Creative Conversations” about theater and their work in it on April 12, 2014 during the annual Greenfield Prize Weekend in Sarasota, FL. This partnership between the Greenfield Foundation of Philadelphia and the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Englewood, FL, offers six week residencies to artists to work on creative projects. The Greenfield Prize, an annual $30,000 commission to create a new work of art, went to playwright Nilo Cruz.

A Theater Conference in Louisville

Since joining the America Theater Critics Association, we have attended conferences in Chicago, Indianapolis, Shepherdstown, West Virginia and, most recently, the 38th Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Kentucky. Through ATCA we are getting an overview of regional American theater. The well-organized conferences comprise intense experiences with meetings, panel discussions and major keynote speakers. (This time: Steinberg Award winning playwright Lauren Gunderson, who was also the keynote speaker for the conference. Also, longtime New York critic Ira J.

James Dean: From Method Actor to Screen Idol

"Dream what you want to dream, go where you want to go, be what you want to be," James Dean has been quoted as saying, "because you have only one life and one chance to do all the things you want to do." Another time, he stated, "The only success, the only greatness is immortality." By that standard, Dean has achieved immortality. Long after his untimely death in 1955, the fascination with Dean lives on. On February 8, 2014, the forever young Dean would have turned 83.

Former Chicago Arts Commissioner Says Collaboration is Key to Success for Sarasota Alliance

Janet Carl Smith, newly retired Deputy Commissioner of Chicago's Department of Cultural Affairs, advised leaders and members of the Arts and Cultural Alliance of Sarasota County to collaborate among themselves and others in an address on February 20, 2014. She shared experiences and ideas to the Alliance and is currently pushing for a renewal of a tax to benefit education in Sarasota, especially in the arts.

La Comedie Italienne Founding Director Arrested for Christmas Crash to Protest Poor Subsidies

Beginning October 10, 2013, La Comedie Italienne, the sole Italian theater in France, began its 40th season of continuing the centuries-old tradition of Italian players and scripts appearing there on stage, especially in Paris. On Christmas Day, the troupe's founder and artistic director, Attillio Maggiulli, was arrested for protesting a devastating cut in national subvention of the theater by attempting to drive his car into an Elysee Palace gate. The most recent news I've learned is that Maggiulli was sent to Police Headquarters and then for psychiatric evaluation.

A Warm and Fuzzy Holiday Gift from Tracy Letts: August: Osage County on Film

Tracy Letts has been known to get excited when honing and honing and honing his work “to make what I’m working on the very piece.” When things didn’t necessarily please him, there are rumors that he screamed, called people names, and wrote exhaustively long e-mails. In writing the screenplay for his Pulitzer Prize, Joseph Jefferson-, Tony-, and Drama Desk Award winning August: Osage County,which played Broadway in December 2007 for 18 months after premiering in his Chicago hometown’s Steppenwolf, he was probably just as vocal, but to himself.

Harlem Nights and Leg Lights: Warren Carlyle's Broadway Season

“There couldn’t be a better holiday season,” says very busy director/choreographer Warren Carlyle. “I truly am blessed to be here and doing what I love. It’s the culmination of all my dreams.”

Margo Martindale Comes to Osage County, On Film

It’s been said that Margo Martindale has gone from being an actress whose face moviegoers and TV viewers know to one who now has a brand name. “It’s nice when people come up to me and actually know my name! Usually it’s ‘Aren’t you -- ?’ or ‘Weren’t you in -- ?’ or ‘Hi, you’re the lady at my bank!’” Now, thanks to capturing the coveted role of Mattie Fae in the film adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer Prize-winning August: Osage County[The Weinstein Company] and her boisterous and blistering performance, everyone’ll know her name.

Broadway Stars Lend Their Voices to Disney's Frozen

“Frozen,” the Walt Disney feature which just opened as the season’s big, animated holiday film, is a movie that almost didn't happen – in spite of years of trying to get an animated film done on Hans Christian Andersen's “The Snow Queen.” Four years in the making, the film arrives and is worth the wait. Critics are calling it the best Disney animated film and musical in years.

PBS’ Great Performances to Highlight Streisand, Hamlisch & Plummer

PBS Great Performances and THIRTEEN have classic treats in store to ring in the holidays. First, on Friday, November 29, 2013: “Barbra Streisand: Back to Brooklyn,” a telecast of the diva's historic Brooklyn homecoming to christen the 19,000-seat, $1-billion Barclays Center, which marked her "home" concert since her childhood (and her first concert in six years). She performs 27 tunes from her five-decade career, joined by guests Il Volo, Chris Botti, a 60-piece orchestra led by William Ross, and, in quite a touching segment, her son Jason Gould.

Beth Henley Returns to New York - and her Southern Roots - for The Jacksonian

There's not a lot of Southern comfort to ease the characters of Beth Henley’s gothic, black-comedy/drama, The Jacksonian, having its New York premiere courtesy of the New Group at Theater Row.

Cherry Jones Takes on The Glass Menagerie's Amanda Wingfield

The 17-week limited engagement of John Tiffany's critically acclaimed revival of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie officially opens at the Booth Theater on September 26, 2013. The production marks the return to the stage of Tony, Drama Desk, and Emmy winner Cherry Jones, who costars as one of Williams' most memorable creations, Amanda Wingfield, the mother of crippled and shy Laura, played by Celia Keenan-Bolger (Peter and the Starcatcher) and Tom, portrayed by Zachary Quinto (Angels in America). Brian J.

Play on Film or Film of Play: Is The Audience Typical?

A showing of Britain’s National Theatre production of “The Audience” on June 13, 2013, broadcast live may not have been as controversial as a few years of filmed ballets and operas, but it played up how the electronic medium adversely affected the play. A major criticism of filmed musical performances, such as operas from Met Live, is that they are edited and therefore not true to what audiences see in a theater. The criticism is like that heaped on television for editing films to fit the TV screen.

Season Three is the Charm: Williamstown Fest's Jenny Gersten Riding High

The third season for Jenny Gersten, artistic director of the Williamstown Theater Festival, ends August 18, 2013 with the final performance of the Broadway-bound musical, The Bridges of Madison County on the Main Stage and the controversial Blood Playon the Nikos stage.

Mark St. Germain - A Working Playwright

From the beginnings of Barrington Stage Company, the playwright Mark Saint Germain has enjoyed a close relationship with artistic director Julianne Boyd. The smaller second stage is even named for the dramatist. From August 15-September 29, 2013 Barrington will present St. Germain’s Scott and Hem in the Garden of Allah.The play premiered this summer at the Contemporary American Theater Festival, in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, which commissioned it. Through a special agreement with CATF the play is having its “Rolling World Premiere” in Pittsfield.

Too Soon or Too Far? Contemporary American Theater Festival Founder Ed Herendeen's Thoughts on This Season's CATF Plays

Some 23 years ago, Ed Herendeen, then with the Williamstown Theater Festival in an administrative position, was invited by the president of Shepherd University, in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, to organize an annual, summer Contemporary American Theatre Festival. Since then, CATF, with Herendeen as producing director, has presented 100 new plays either as premieres or second productions of works in development.

Kate Burton on Hapgood, Stoppard and Family

Kate Burton stars in Tom Stoppard’s Hapgoodin a just-about sold-out, two-week run (July 10-21, 2013) in a return to familiar home turf at the Williamstown Theater Festival. Her husband, Michael Ritchie, was WTF’s former artistic director for nine years. The current AD, Jenny Gersten, was his assistant producer.

Celebrating Broadway's Big Event: the 67th Tony Awards

Remember the old M-G-M axiom: "More stars than there are in the heavens!" The 2013 Tony Awards, the 67th annual, telecast by CBS live from Radio City Music Hall on Sunday from 8-11 PM, has that beat. There'll be more stars than there are in the galaxy! Minus one, and more about that later.

The stars are aligning! Tony fav, six-time Emmy nominee and two-time winner and four-time Golden Globe nominee Neil Patrick Harris returns as the host with the mostest. Expect humorous barbs and songs.

Lauper's Kinky Boots Arrives on CD

The original Broadway cast CD of Grammy-winning rock icon Cyndi Lauper and four-time Tony Harvey Fierstein’s richly diverse Kinky Boots,nominated for 13 Tonys, including Best Musical, Score, and Book, is now available (Masterworks Broadway).

Not All Must-Sees are On Broadway

Do you know the way to off-Broadway, where this has been one of the best seasons ever? Theaters are easy to find, and off-Broadway has everything Broadway has, including (as a rule, but not always) uncomfortable seats and stages that are (often but not always) smaller. However, OB also offers tickets that are definitely cheaper. Two of the best and most nominated shows are big hits, and two potential hits have just arrived.

Remembering Jean Stapleton

What I’ll always remember about Jean Stapleton is her wonderful giggle followed by an uproarious laugh. And when Miss Stapleton laughed, everyone heard. But there was so much more to this terrific lady: her sweetness, kindness, and thoughtfulness.

Of course, being a musicals buff, I knew who Jean Stapleton was when she got the co-starring role in TV’s groundbreaking “All in the Family.” I remembered her from the film adaptations of Bells Are Ringing and Damn Yankees and so regretted that I never got to see her do those roles onstage.

People Who Knew Sue Mengers

Sue Mengers was a trailblazer as the first female super-agent. She was powerful, revengeful, and witheringly sarcastic, but to those she loved, and vice versa, she was a mensch. Ms. Mengers passed away in 2011 at age 79 after a series of chronic illnesses and tiny strokes. In John Logan's play currently running on Broadway, I'll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers,she is channeled brilliantly by Bette Midler.

Blurring Boundaries Between Artists and Critics

Charles Giuliano recently sat down for a conversation with Barrington Stage artistic director Julianne Boyd to discuss the ever-complicated relationship between critics and the artists they cover.

Same Play, Different Places

Charles Giuliano recently interviewed Massachusetts’ Barrington Stage Company artistic director Julianne Boyd about the homogenization of regional-theater programming.

Barrington Stage: The Capital, The Community, The Critics

Charles Giuliano recently interviewed Massachusetts’ Barrington Stage Company artistic director Julianne Boyd about the theater’s $7 million capital campaign.

Charles Giuliano: What is the current financial status of Barrington Stage Company?
Julianne Boyd We moved in 2006. This is our 8th season in Pittsfield. Last May we acquired the former V.F.W. just a couple of streets over from our theater.

Shonn Wiley - On His Toes

Triple-threat Shonn Wiley has done lots of shows in all sorts of venues, but even if you were to chart his career only in terms of his participation in the City Center Encores! series of staged concert musicals, you'd see clearly that he's a rising star. His first Encores!

Skip to Our Lu

Guitar-playing, folk-singing octodynamo, Lu Mitchell is mighty fine at 89. Not one to rest on her laurels, Lu is busy writing new songs, launching her tenth album, and rehearsing for her annual Irish show on March 12, 2013 at Pocket Sandwich Theater where she plays four gigs each year. This is in addition to numerous appearances at corporate functions, private parties, a holiday show at Uncle Calvin's Coffee House, and the annual Senior Follies extravaganza at the Eisemann Center.

Janie Minick - Taylor Made

When Janie Minick walks onstage and announces: "I'm Elizabeth Taylor Wilding Todd Fisher Burton Burton Warner Fortensky," you would suspend all manner of disbelief if Taylor were still alive. She is, of course, referring to her marriages to hotel heir Nicky Hilton, British actor Michael Wilding, Hollywood film producer Mike Todd, singer Eddie Fisher, Welsh actor Richard Burton (to whom she was wed twice), Virginia senator John Warner, and construction worker Larry Fortensky. She then interweaves the story of her life, romances, and marriages to each of them.

Melissa Hall: Making a Theater Blog Count in Indianapolis

Editor’s Note: Twice each year, members of The American Theater Critics Association (ATCA) visit a city for several days of theatergoing and soaking in the local culture. In March 2013, ATCA held its annual mini-meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana, where Charles Giuliano was able to interview Indy theater critic Melissa Hall.

For Janis Paige, It's Today

Janis Paige was supposed to play Feinstein's last spring, and I had the pleasure of interviewing her via telephone in advance of that planned appearance. But then she was injured in a fall and couldn't make the trip to New York from her home in L.A., so our interview was never published.

Rehashing Regional Theater

Coming soon to a theatre near you.

In 2010 Barrington Stage Company, in Pittsfield, MA, presented The Whipping Man by Matthew Lopez. It was staged in the smaller of two theaters now known as the Mark St. Germain after its board member and associate playwright.

Last week, as part of a meeting of American Theatre Critics Association (ATCA), I saw another production of The Whipping Man at the Indiana Repertory Theatre in Indianapolis. Both productions were excellent, with the Indy one far more elaborate in a larger venue (more like Barrington’s main stage).

Michael Feinstein and Barbara Cook Back Home in Indiana

The 1,600 seat Palladium in the $125 million Center for the Performing Arts, in Carmel, Indiana (a half hour drive from Indianapolis) opened in 2011 after years of planning. The magnificent, neo-classical structure, which features superb acoustics, gets its name from the Villa La Rotonda (1556) a Renaissance villa just outside Vicenza, northern Italy, designed by Andrea Palladio.

Lorna Luft to Brighten Birdland

Singer-actress Lorna Luft makes her Birdland cabaret debut in “Lorna's Living Room,” with two different shows, February 11 and 18, 2013, both at 7pm. “It’s like having old friends over,” she says. “We make merry, laugh, and sing. I’m the hostess-with-the-mostest, so to speak. And anything can happen.”

Fosse's Cabaret Restored for Blu-ray

One critic summed up the film adaptation of the 1967 Tony-winning musical, Cabaret, as “a darkly sexy beast.” It’s certainly dark and sexy, while being immensely musically entertaining; and now, thanks to a restoration and remastering by Warner Bros., you might say a lot of light has been shed on Bob Fosse’s version which borders on a masterpiece and which netted him an Oscar.

Broadway By the Year Returns Us to 1937

The 13th season of the Town Hall's “Broadway by the Year” series gets off to a rousing start Monday, Feb. 11, at 8pm saluting 1937. It will be a very romantic line-up of tunes just in time for Valentine’s Day. Headlining will be Nightlife Award winning vocalist Carole J.

PBS Displays Shakespeare Uncovered

“To be, or not to be: that is the question.” “Hell is empty and all the devils are here.” These lines from Hamlet and The Tempestare among Shakespeare’s most quoted.

A Night to Remember: Phantom of the Opera's 25th Anniversary

The Phantom of the Opera.The longest-running show in Broadway history. 25 years on Broadway. 1,0399 performances. And all in one theater.

Saturday’s black-tie performance for an invited audience of great fans, celebrities and numerous alumni of the show and festive gala was worthy of the opening night of a landmark musical. One that’s become a worldwide blockbuster for composer Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyricists Charles Hart and Richard Stilgoe.

Phantom of the Opera Prepares to Make History Again

Instead of Cats being labeled “Now and Forever,” that catchphrase should have been saved for The Phantom of the Opera.On Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, it will celebrate the unprecedented milestone of playing on Broadway 25 years and counting – and in one theater, the Majestic.

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